Курсы английского
<<  An immigrant language in South America: The status of Welsh in Argentina as an RML compared with European immigrant languages Технология коммуникативного обучения на основе общения в интерактивном режиме является сущностью всех интенсивных технологий обучения иностранному языку  >>
From the Common European Framework of Reference to the European
From the Common European Framework of Reference to the European
Overview
Overview
What is the ELP
What is the ELP
I can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in
I can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in
What is the ELP
What is the ELP
What is the ELP
What is the ELP
CercleS ELP: goal-setting and self-assessment checklists
CercleS ELP: goal-setting and self-assessment checklists
What is the ELP
What is the ELP
What is the ELP
What is the ELP
What is the ELP
What is the ELP
What is the ELP
What is the ELP
A brief history
A brief history
A brief history
A brief history
A brief history
A brief history
A brief history
A brief history
A brief history
A brief history
The challenge to pedagogy
The challenge to pedagogy
The challenge to curricula
The challenge to curricula
The challenge to assessment
The challenge to assessment
Language education policy
Language education policy
Language education policy
Language education policy
Conclusion
Conclusion
Conclusion
Conclusion

Презентация на тему: «From the Common European Framework of Reference to the European Language Portfolio». Автор: . Файл: «From the Common European Framework of Reference to the European Language Portfolio.ppt». Размер zip-архива: 1140 КБ.

From the Common European Framework of Reference to the European Language Portfolio

содержание презентации «From the Common European Framework of Reference to the European Language Portfolio.ppt»
СлайдТекст
1 From the Common European Framework of Reference to the European

From the Common European Framework of Reference to the European

Language Portfolio

David Little

2 Overview

Overview

What is the European Language Portfolio? A brief history: 1991 ? 2007 The challenge that the ELP poses to pedagogy curricula assessment The challenge to language education policy Conclusion

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

3 What is the ELP

What is the ELP

Three obligatory components: Language passport ? Summarizes the owner’s linguistic identity and language learning and intercultural experience; records the owner’s self-assessment against the Self-assessment Grid in the CEFR

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

4 I can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in

I can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in

an area where the language is spoken. I can enter unprepared into conversation on topics that are familiar, of personal interest or pertinent to everyday life (e.g. family, hobbies, work, travel and current events).

Self-assessment grid (CEF and standard adult passport)

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

5 What is the ELP

What is the ELP

Three obligatory components: Language passport ? Summarizes the owner’s linguistic identity and language learning and intercultural experience; records the owner’s self-assessment against the Self-assessment Grid in the CEFR

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

6 What is the ELP

What is the ELP

Three obligatory components: Language passport ? Summarizes the owner’s linguistic identity and language learning and intercultural experience; records the owner’s self-assessment against the Self-assessment Grid in the CEFR Language biography ? Provides a reflective accompaniment to the ongoing processes of learning and using second languages and engaging with the cultures associated with them; uses “I can” checklists for goal setting and self-assessment

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

7 CercleS ELP: goal-setting and self-assessment checklists

CercleS ELP: goal-setting and self-assessment checklists

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

8 What is the ELP

What is the ELP

Three obligatory components: Language passport ? Summarizes the owner’s linguistic identity and language learning and intercultural experience; records the owner’s self-assessment against the Self-assessment Grid in the CEFR Language biography ? Provides a reflective accompaniment to the ongoing processes of learning and using second languages and engaging with the cultures associated with them; uses “I can” checklists for goal setting and self-assessment

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

9 What is the ELP

What is the ELP

Three obligatory components: Language passport ? Summarizes the owner’s linguistic identity and language learning and intercultural experience; records the owner’s self-assessment against the Self-assessment Grid in the CEFR Language biography ? Provides a reflective accompaniment to the ongoing processes of learning and using second languages and engaging with the cultures associated with them; uses “I can” checklists for goal setting and self-assessment Dossier ? Collects evidence of L2 proficiency and intercultural experience; supports portfolio learning

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

10 What is the ELP

What is the ELP

Two functions: Pedagogical function – The ELP is designed to make the language learning process more transparent to the learner and foster the development of learner autonomy (cf. the Council of Europe’s commitment to education for democratic citizenship and lifelong learning) Reporting function – The ELP provides practical evidence of L2 proficiency and intercultural experience (cf. the Council of Europe’s interest in developing a unit credit scheme in the 1970s)

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

11 What is the ELP

What is the ELP

Key features: Values all language and intercultural learning, whether it takes place in formal educational contexts or outside them Some educational traditions find this problematic Designed to promote plurilingualism and pluriculturalism This has posed a particular challenge to ELP design The revised French ELP for older adolescents and adults (5.2000 rev.2006) marks an important breakthrough

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

12 A brief history

A brief history

The R?schlikon Symposium (1991; CoE 1992): Recommended the development of a Common European Framework Recommended the establishment of a working party to consider possible forms and functions of a European Language Portfolio Proposed that the ELP should contain a section in which formal qualifications are related to a common European scale, another in which the learner him/herself keeps a personal record of language learning experiences, and possibly a third which contains examples of work done

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

13 A brief history

A brief history

1997: publication of proposals for the development of ELPs for language learners of different ages and in different domains (CoE 1997) 1998?2000: ELP pilot projects (Sch?rer 2000) 15 countries 3 INGOs: ALTE/EAQUALS, CercleS, ELC About 2,000 teachers About 30,000 learners 1998?2000: evolution of Principles and Guidelines (CoE 2000; annotated version, CoE 2004; now part of European Language Portfolio: Key Reference Documents, CoE 2006)

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

14 A brief history

A brief history

Supports provided by the Language Policy Division: G. Schneider and P. Lenz, European Language Portfolio: Guide for Developers, 2001 D. Little and R. Perclov?, European Language Portfolio: Guide for Teachers and Teacher Trainers, 2001 D. Little (ed.), The European Language Portfolio in use: nine examples, 2003 D. Little and B. Simpson, The intercultural component and learning how to learn (language biography templates), 2003 Data bank of descriptors for use in checklists, 2003

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

15 A brief history

A brief history

Today the Council of Europe’s website lists 80 validated and accredited ELPs from 25 countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Russian Federation, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom 3 INGOs: EAQUALS/ALTE, CercleS, European Language Council 1 consortium: Milestone Project (Socrates-Comenius 2.1) According to figures submitted by ELP contact persons in Council of Europe member states, approximately 2 million ELPs had been distributed by 2005

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

16 A brief history

A brief history

There is a small but convincing body of empirical research to show that the ELP can make a positive difference to language learners and teachers, for example: Finland (Kohonen 2002, 2004) Czech Republic (Perclov? 2006) Ireland (Ushioda and Ridley 2002, Sisamakis 2006) But a wealth of anecdotal evidence suggests that there is a lot of resistance to the ELP: 2 million ELPs may have been distributed, but it seems that only a small percentage are in regular use Because the ELP (with the CEFR behind it) poses a challenge to pedagogy, curricula and assessment

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

17 The challenge to pedagogy

The challenge to pedagogy

The ELP is designed to promote the development of learner autonomy It does this by stimulating reflection on the content and process of learning and (especially) assigning a central role to self-assessment This aspect of ELP use requires significant pedagogical innovation: despite the aim of many national curricula to promote learner independence and critical thinking, self-assessment and other forms of reflection are not widely practised The challenge to pedagogy is also a challenge to teacher education

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

18 The challenge to curricula

The challenge to curricula

The ELP is often felt by teachers and learners to demand additional effort that is not obviously related to the curriculum This might change if curricula were expressed (partly) in the CEFR’s action-oriented (“can do”) terms An example: Ireland’s approach to teaching English as a second language to immigrant pupils in primary schools: Scaled (“can do”) curriculum (CEFR levels A1?B1) ELP mediates curriculum to pupils via “I can” checklists ELP and “pre-ELP” used on a large scale

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

19 The challenge to assessment

The challenge to assessment

The CEFR offers to bring curriculum, pedagogy and assessment into closer interaction with one another than has often been the case Each “can do” descriptor implies A learning target Teaching/learning activities Assessment criteria The self-assessment checklists in the ELP can serve the same three functions Do national/public examinations likewise reflect an action-oriented approach?

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

20 Language education policy

Language education policy

According to the Principles and Guidelines, the ELP should support the development of plurilingualism and pluriculturalism Every model should accommodate all the second/foreign languages the owner knows, including those learnt outside formal education Every model should prompt the owner to reflect on his/her developing plurilingual and pluricultural identity In this way the ELP reflects the ideal (necessity?) of a Europe strongly committed to lifelong language learning

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

21 Language education policy

Language education policy

The plurilingual/pluricultural dimension of the ELP requires significant pedagogical innovation: it can be realized only if schools use the ELP to underpin the teaching of all languages in some kind of interaction with one another The plurilingual/pluricultural dimension also challenges national authorities to reconsider key features of their language education policy: Which languages should be offered? How many languages should the individual student learn, for how long, and to what level(s)?

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

22 Conclusion

Conclusion

The ELP has the capacity to transform language teaching and learning It supports the reflective cycle of planning, implementing and evaluating learning It makes language learners aware of their evolving plurilingual/pluricultural identity It can facilitate the implementation of language education policies that assign a central role to plurilingualism It provides practical evidence that complements the more abstract evidence of exam grades and certificates

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

23 Conclusion

Conclusion

The ELP is unlikely to become a fixture in national educational systems unless it is strongly promoted by ministries given a central role in language teacher education supported by a curriculum that defines language learning goals in “can do” terms complemented by examinations that are explicitly shaped by an action-oriented philosophy

Intergovernmental Policy Forum, Council of Europe, 6?8 February 2007

«From the Common European Framework of Reference to the European Language Portfolio»
http://900igr.net/prezentacija/anglijskij-jazyk/from-the-common-european-framework-of-reference-to-the-european-language-portfolio-140638.html
cсылка на страницу
Урок

Английский язык

29 тем
Слайды
900igr.net > Презентации по английскому языку > Курсы английского > From the Common European Framework of Reference to the European Language Portfolio