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From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change
From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change
Contents
Contents
My role and aims
My role and aims
Roads Task Force (RTF) report
Roads Task Force (RTF) report
The RTF has identified six road/street functions
The RTF has identified six road/street functions
A Family of Street types
A Family of Street types
Implications
Implications
Workshop 1: Local Stakeholders
Workshop 1: Local Stakeholders
Conventional approach to street design
Conventional approach to street design
Balanced approach to street design
Balanced approach to street design
Sample of research findings
Sample of research findings
Signal removal: four case study sites
Signal removal: four case study sites
Changes in pedestrian behaviour
Changes in pedestrian behaviour
Junction safety
Junction safety
Conclusions
Conclusions
Streets as interchanges
Streets as interchanges
Levels of bus-to-bus interchange, Route 333
Levels of bus-to-bus interchange, Route 333
Asymmetrical bus passenger flows, Tooting Broadway
Asymmetrical bus passenger flows, Tooting Broadway
Range of footway users
Range of footway users
From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change
From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change
The Variety of Street Activities
The Variety of Street Activities
Street activities: Great George Street
Street activities: Great George Street
From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change
From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change
Range of footway services
Range of footway services
From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change
From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change
What is a street furniture footprint
What is a street furniture footprint
Some street furniture footprints
Some street furniture footprints
Taking Stock: Gaps in knowledge
Taking Stock: Gaps in knowledge
Taking Stock: Where do we stand
Taking Stock: Where do we stand
Opportunities and Allies
Opportunities and Allies
Opportunities and Allies
Opportunities and Allies

: From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change. : Peter Jones. : From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change.ppt. zip-: 13563 .

From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change

From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change.ppt
1 From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change

From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change

Peter Jones Professor of Transport and Sustainable Development

Keynote Speech: Living Streets Annual Supporters Conference, June 2013

2 Contents

Contents

My role and aims Roads Task Force Report a great opportunity Some recent research findings: Traffic signal removal and pedestrians Streets as interchanges Street activities Mapping furniture footprints Taking stock Gaps in knowledge Opportunities and allies

3 My role and aims

My role and aims

Role: the ECs critical friend model Aims: Highlight opportunities created by forthcoming RTF report Show examples of wealth of research to draw on, alongside practical experience Encourage closer working between activists and academics Propose a future challenge

4 Roads Task Force (RTF) report

Roads Task Force (RTF) report

Set up by the Mayor to take a long-term look at the needs of Londons roads independent panel Report due to be launched on 10th July Key messages: Most London roads are streets, with multiple functions This is MUCH more than just about vehicle movement Quality of public realm and street experience crucial to continuing success of London as a global leading city Cant continue to compromise all the time

5 The RTF has identified six road/street functions

The RTF has identified six road/street functions

6 A Family of Street types

A Family of Street types

Bringing them together: Londons street family

6

7 Implications

Implications

This is important because: It recognises that streets have multiple functions, emphasising many things that Living Streets has been promoting for a long time It gets way from the one size fits all mentality: vehicle traffic is NOT always the first priority It gives full weight to Place/Living street functions This requires new approaches to sensitive street design and community engagement again, where Living Streets has much to offer

8 Workshop 1: Local Stakeholders

Workshop 1: Local Stakeholders

9 Conventional approach to street design

Conventional approach to street design

Residential area

District shopping centre

10 Balanced approach to street design

Balanced approach to street design

Residential area

District shopping centre

11 Sample of research findings

Sample of research findings

Impacts of traffic signal removal on pedestrians (Clare Woodcock) Streets as interchanges (Ian James) Street activities (Lucy Godfrey) Mapping street furniture footprints (Rachel Palfreeman)

12 Signal removal: four case study sites

Signal removal: four case study sites

Wyndham Way junction with High Street

13 Changes in pedestrian behaviour

Changes in pedestrian behaviour

Cabstand/ Wyndham Way

Wyndham Way/ High Street

Jermyn Street/ Duke Street Saint James

Ruislip Road East/ Greenford Avenue

Pedestrian Flow

The same

Increased

Increased

Decreased

Composition

Changed by a small amount, not statistically significant.

Changed by a small amount, not statistically significant.

Changed by a small amount, not statistically significant.

Changed by a small amount, not statistically significant.

Formal and informal crossing

Informal crossing increased.

Informal crossing increased.

Informal crossing increased.

Informal crossing decreased by significant percentage (-16%).

Delay

Decreased in HPHV and LPHV, increased in LPLV.

Decreased during LPHV and HPHV conditions, and remained the same during LPLV.

Increased during two conditions: HPHV, LPLV and remained the same during LPHV.

Increased during all four conditions.

Crossing Speed

Decreased during all conditions

Increased during LPLV, remained the same during HPHV and LPHV.

Increased during all conditions

Increased during all conditions.

14 Junction safety

Junction safety

Pedestrian perceptions: Ealing

Cabstand/ Wyndham Way

Wyndham Way/ High Street

Jermyn Street/ Duke Street Saint James

Ruislip Road East/ Greenford Avenue

Accident Statistics

No accidents before or after.

Number of accidents increased after the signals were removed. - No pedestrian accidents.

One accident before, one accident after. No pedestrian accidents.

Six accidents before, two were pedestrian/ vehicle collisions. No accident information available after signal removal.

15 Conclusions

Conclusions

Clear benefits to vehicles from removing signals Junction layout key influence on pedestrian impacts Traffic signal removal is most appropriate where there are equal numbers of pedestrians and vehicles, and where vehicle speed is relatively slow. Least appropriate at junctions where there are dominant vehicle movements in which removing control might encourage increased vehicle speeds. Removal of signalised control should be considered alongside traffic calming measures such as chicanes, raised tables, speed bumps or lower speed limits. Provision for vulnerable pedestrians, particularly for the mobility impaired remains a key concern because without signal facilities, vulnerable pedestrians may be unable to cross the junction.

16 Streets as interchanges

Streets as interchanges

Tooting Broadway, South London

17 Levels of bus-to-bus interchange, Route 333

Levels of bus-to-bus interchange, Route 333

18 Asymmetrical bus passenger flows, Tooting Broadway

Asymmetrical bus passenger flows, Tooting Broadway

19 Range of footway users

Range of footway users

Striders traffic Traders Customers Browsers Queuers Entertainers

Socialisers Observers Waiters Resters Inhabiters

20 From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change
21 The Variety of Street Activities

The Variety of Street Activities

22 Street activities: Great George Street

Street activities: Great George Street

23 From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change
24 Range of footway services

Range of footway services

Retail services (stalls, paper sellers, etc.) Communications (phone & post boxes) Cash point machines Public transport services (shelters, info.) Public amenity (seating, toilets, bins,) Public art and greenery Wayfinding and traffic regulation

25 From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change
26 What is a street furniture footprint

What is a street furniture footprint

Street space available is therefore reduced

Bus shelter and footprint

Bin and footprint

27 Some street furniture footprints

Some street furniture footprints

Size of Furniture (width x length)

Total Footprint

Cycle stand

0.10m x 0.60 m

0.60m x 1.30m

Bench

0.48m x 1.06m

1.18m x 1.18m

Rubbish bin

0.50m x 0.50m

1.20m x 1.50m

Bus stop area

1.30m x 3.25m

2.40m x 3.90m

28 Taking Stock: Gaps in knowledge

Taking Stock: Gaps in knowledge

Vehicle movement is well research and applied: Full design standards Quantitative performance measures Comprehensive modelling capability Extensive appraisal of benefits Less is understood about pedestrian movement Virtually NOTHING is known about street activity: No established design standards No robust performance measures No modelling and appraisal

29 Taking Stock: Where do we stand

Taking Stock: Where do we stand

Living streets chimes with the times, so a good start! But, this is about much more than pedestrians! Most work on streets still on a modal basis, not holistic, and General reference to encouraging walking and cycling And the balance of attention?? 80% cycling 15% walking 5% street activity

30 Opportunities and Allies

Opportunities and Allies

Scope for academics, practitioners and activists to work closer together while recognising each others agendas RTF report provides a good basis for moving forward putting the living back into streets! It recognises the key importance of streets as places and the need to raise street quality and foster street activity Many powerful groups support this change of emphasis health, developers, retailers, etc. But streets need champions and custodians, who cherish the diversity of urban streets and their functions

31 Opportunities and Allies

Opportunities and Allies

Scope for academics, practitioners and activists to work closer together while recognising each others agendas RTF report provides a good basis for moving forward putting the living back into streets! It recognises the key importance of streets as places and the need to raise street quality and foster street activity Many powerful groups support this change of emphasis health, developers, retailers, etc. But streets need champions and custodians, who cherish the diversity of urban streets and their functions .is this where YOU come in?

From Urban Roads to Living Streets: Making the Change
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