Английский язык для детей
<<  Использование языкового портфеля в обучении немецкому языку Пауэр поинт спорт  >>
LESS SPOKEN LANGUAGES & THE POLITICS OF EUROPEAN MULTILINGUALISM
LESS SPOKEN LANGUAGES & THE POLITICS OF EUROPEAN MULTILINGUALISM
“Strong” “Weak” Other terminology
“Strong” “Weak” Other terminology
Official and Spoken Languages of EU Countries
Official and Spoken Languages of EU Countries
Official and Spoken Languages of EU Countries (cont)
Official and Spoken Languages of EU Countries (cont)
Official and Spoken Languages of EU Countries (cont)
Official and Spoken Languages of EU Countries (cont)
Theory Young Europeans should learn two languages apart from their
Theory Young Europeans should learn two languages apart from their
European Projects
European Projects
Practice
Practice
The EU recognizes procedural, official and treaty languages
The EU recognizes procedural, official and treaty languages
EU citizens and firms, nonetheless, are entitled to communicate with
EU citizens and firms, nonetheless, are entitled to communicate with
Information and data
Information and data
Level of the language spoken - EU%
Level of the language spoken - EU%
Languages most commonly used in the EU - %
Languages most commonly used in the EU - %
Statistical conclusions
Statistical conclusions
Decision on language learning based on financial reasoning Learning
Decision on language learning based on financial reasoning Learning
Questions
Questions

Презентация на тему: «LESS SPOKEN LANGUAGES THE POLITICS OF EUROPEAN MULTILINGUALISM». Автор: Modern Language Centre. Файл: «LESS SPOKEN LANGUAGES THE POLITICS OF EUROPEAN MULTILINGUALISM.ppt». Размер zip-архива: 809 КБ.

LESS SPOKEN LANGUAGES THE POLITICS OF EUROPEAN MULTILINGUALISM

содержание презентации «LESS SPOKEN LANGUAGES THE POLITICS OF EUROPEAN MULTILINGUALISM.ppt»
СлайдТекст
1 LESS SPOKEN LANGUAGES & THE POLITICS OF EUROPEAN MULTILINGUALISM

LESS SPOKEN LANGUAGES & THE POLITICS OF EUROPEAN MULTILINGUALISM

Dr Eleni Markou Coordinator of Less Taught Languages Modern Language Centre

2 “Strong” “Weak” Other terminology

“Strong” “Weak” Other terminology

Implications?

Types of Languages

3 Official and Spoken Languages of EU Countries

Official and Spoken Languages of EU Countries

Country

Official & national Languages

Other spoken Languages

Austria

German, Slovene (official in Carinthia), Croatian & Hungarian (official in Burgenland)

Belgium

Dutch 60%, French 40%, German less than 1%

Bulgaria

Bulgarian

Turkish

Cyprus

Greek, Turkish, English

Czech Republic

Czech (cestina)

Denmark

Danish (dansk)

Standard German

Estonia

Estonian (eesti keel)

Russian, Ukrainian, Finnish

Finland

Finnish (suomi) 93.4%, Swedish 5.9%

small Sami-& Russian-speaking minorities

France

French (fran?ais)

Germany

German (Deutsch)

4 Official and Spoken Languages of EU Countries (cont)

Official and Spoken Languages of EU Countries (cont)

Country

Official & national language

Other spoken lang.

Greece

Greek (ellinik?, the Koine-Demotic version)

Turkish (Northern Greece)

Hungary

Hungarian (magyar)

German, Romanian

Ireland

Irish (Gaeilge), English (generally used),

Italy

Italian (italiano)

Latvia

Latvian (latviesu valoda)

Lithuanian, Russian

Lithuania

Lithuanian (lietuviu kalba)

Polish, Russian

Luxembourg

Luxembourgish (L?tzebuergesch, the everyday spoken language), French (administrative language), German (administrative language)

Malta

Maltese (Malti)

English

Netherlands

Dutch (Nederlands, official language), Frisian (official language)

Poland

Polish (polski)

5 Official and Spoken Languages of EU Countries (cont)

Official and Spoken Languages of EU Countries (cont)

Country

Official & national language

Other spoken language

Portugal

Portuguese (portugu?s)

Romania

Romanian (romana)

Hungarian, German

Slovakia

Slovak (slovensky jazyk)

Hungarian

Slovenia

Slovenian (slovenski jezik)

Spain

Spanish (espa?ol - the Castilian version) 74%, Catalan 17%, Galician 7%, Basque 2%

note: Castilian is the official language nationwide; the other languages are official regionally.

Sweden

Swedish (svenska)

small Sami- and Finnish-speaking minorities.

United Kingdom

English

Welsh (about 26% of the population of Wales), Scottish form of Gaelic (about 60,000 in Scotland)

6 Theory Young Europeans should learn two languages apart from their

Theory Young Europeans should learn two languages apart from their

mother tongue (White Paper on Teaching & Learning, 1996, Office for the official publications of the European Communities)

EU attitudes to multilingualism

7 European Projects

European Projects

EU policy - to protect and promote regional and minority languages The EU has a positive policy towards regional and minority languages, enshrined in Article 22 of the European Charter of Fundamental Rights, which states, “The Union respects cultural, religious and linguistic diversity”. In 1992, the European Commission initiated a detailed study of regional and minority language communities in the EU. As new countries joined the Union, the scope of the study was widened. (Euromosaic ). In addition, the European Commission provided support to the ADUM project (2004-05). ADUM informs people and organisations working to support regional or minority languages about European funding opportunities. Other recent projects include CRAMLAP (Celtic, Regional and Minority Languages Abroad Project), which has undertaken an audit and evaluation of Higher Education provision of Celtic and other regional and minority languages in Europe, and the Network of European Language Planning Boards, established to promote co-operation between minority language planning boards in Europe. The Network to Promote Linguistic Diversity (NPLD) is a pan-European Network which covers regional, minority, indigenous, cross-border and smaller national languages to promote linguistic diversity in Europe. The main focus is providing information about and easy access to a large network of organisations that can share ideas, information and best practice regarding the promotion of less widely used languages. For an overview of regional and minority language projects supported by the European Union, see the “Regional and Minority” Language Products page.

8 Practice

Practice

Since its inception, the EU has put a great emphasis on multilingualism, and, in line with this policy, it currently recognizes 21 official languages. While formally all official languages enjoy the same privileges, they do not have the same prominence within the EU administration. According to the European Commission, 62% of its documents were initially prepared in English, 26 % in French, and 3.1 % in German in 2004. The remaining languages accounted for less than 9 % of inputs into EU Bureaucracy.

9 The EU recognizes procedural, official and treaty languages

The EU recognizes procedural, official and treaty languages

Procedural languages: English, French and German Official languages: Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Maltese, Polish, Portuguese, Slovak, Slovene, Spanish, and Swedish and, as of recently, Irish. Treaty languages: Luxembourgish, and until recently Irish.

10 EU citizens and firms, nonetheless, are entitled to communicate with

EU citizens and firms, nonetheless, are entitled to communicate with

the EU in any official or treaty language. This privilege, however, does not extend to minority languages such as Welsh, Catalan, or Basque, even when they have an official or semi-official status in their own country.

11 Information and data

Information and data

Among the EU15 population (if not in magnitude then at least in ordering): 55% speak English, 34 % French, and 31 % German

12 Level of the language spoken - EU%

Level of the language spoken - EU%

13 Languages most commonly used in the EU - %

Languages most commonly used in the EU - %

14 Statistical conclusions

Statistical conclusions

The mother tongue of the respondent is in most of the cases one of the official languages of the country of residence. Mobility inside the EU and immigration from outside the EU do not have significant impact on the figures. 50% of the EU citizens speak at least one other language than their mother tongue. The languages known slightly differ between EU15 and EU10 which joined the EU in 2004. English keeps on growing its share as the most widely spoken foreign language. Both French and German have also slightly increased their share compared to the situation in 2001. When looking at the overall situation within the EU, English remains the most widely used language, followed by German and French. Compared to the situation in 2001, the enlargement of the EU has brought Polish and Russian into the list. The level of foreign languages spoken tends to be good, according to the respondents. Considering five most widely used languages spoken as a foreign language, over half of the respondents rate the level of their skills good or very good (English 69%, Spanish 65%, German 58%, French 55%, Russian 54%). In all these languages, the estimate of the level of language skills is higher than what was observed in 2001.

15 Decision on language learning based on financial reasoning Learning

Decision on language learning based on financial reasoning Learning

“powerful languages” can offer political influence

Implications for less spoken languages

16 Questions

Questions

«LESS SPOKEN LANGUAGES THE POLITICS OF EUROPEAN MULTILINGUALISM»
http://900igr.net/prezentacija/anglijskij-jazyk/less-spoken-languages-the-politics-of-european-multilingualism-162826.html
cсылка на страницу

Английский язык для детей

29 презентаций об английском языке для детей
Урок

Английский язык

29 тем
Слайды