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Chapter 14  Progressive and Glitter Rock
Chapter 14 Progressive and Glitter Rock
Progressive Rock Music
Progressive Rock Music
Listening Guide:
Listening Guide:
Orchestral Rock
Orchestral Rock
Orchestral Rock Groups
Orchestral Rock Groups
Progressive Rock Based on Classical Forms
Progressive Rock Based on Classical Forms
Listening Guide
Listening Guide
Progressive Rock Influenced by Avant-Garde Trends
Progressive Rock Influenced by Avant-Garde Trends
Listening Guide
Listening Guide
Frank Zappa
Frank Zappa
Listening Guide
Listening Guide
Progressive Rock with Roots in Hard Rock
Progressive Rock with Roots in Hard Rock
Listening Guide
Listening Guide
Glitter Rock
Glitter Rock
Listening Guide
Listening Guide
Other Glitter Performers
Other Glitter Performers
Listening Guide
Listening Guide
Discussion Questions
Discussion Questions

: Progressive and Glitter Rock. : Kathie. : Progressive and Glitter Rock.ppt. zip-: 52 .

Progressive and Glitter Rock

Progressive and Glitter Rock.ppt
1 Chapter 14  Progressive and Glitter Rock

Chapter 14 Progressive and Glitter Rock

What started to happen in music at this time was more of the well-educated university graduate types were coming in as musicians and band members. Chris Blackwell of Island Records

McGraw-Hill/Irwin

Copyright 2011 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

2 Progressive Rock Music

Progressive Rock Music

Progressive rock music combines rock music and instruments with influences from classical music The Beatles Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967) album: Aleatory to create circus effects in Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite Aleatory with orchestra in A Day in the Life Classical balance in opening song repeated near the end Addition of classical instruments on rock recordings: String sections used in pop rock recordings 1959-1964 Phil Spectors wall of sound productions used other orchestral instruments Beatles use of string quartets in songs Yesterday and Eleanor Rigby Full orchestra used by the Moody Blues beginning in 1967 Most Progressive Rock bands were British, although the American Frank Zappa somewhat fit the style

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3 Listening Guide:

Listening Guide:

Nights in White Satin by the Moody Blues (1967) Tempo: 52 beats per minute, 4 beats per bar Each beat subdivided into 3 sections, making each bar feel like 12 faster beats Form: A section has a solo singer singing a 4-bar melody two times, accompanied by the orchestra and rock band Orchestra louder for a 4-bar B section More A and B sections follow, then a 12-bar instrumental section features flute, plucked acoustic guitar, and strings with a rock backbeat in drums A and B sections follow the instrumental Features: The recording begins with a swirl of sound played by strings, flute, harp, and chimes before the drums enter Strong backbeat in drums until the orchestral finale The recording concludes with the recitation of a poem Lyrics: Love has disoriented the singer. The theme of endless love letters is used to express a general sense of unrequited love. Charts: Pop, #2 for two weeks, British hits, #19

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4 Orchestral Rock

Orchestral Rock

Problems working with a live orchestra: Music must all be notated in advance because a large orchestra cannot jam Rehearsals music be organized and scheduled well in advance Costs of touring with many musicians and their instruments (transportation, food, and lodging) Solution for many progressive bands: Use a mellotron to imitate the sound of orchestral instruments Use just a few orchestral instruments, but not a full orchestra

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5 Orchestral Rock Groups

Orchestral Rock Groups

Genesis used mellotron and flute Procol Harum included organ and added a studio orchestra with celeste, marimba, recorder, conga drums, tabla, and tambourine Jethro Tull included flute and recorded classical instrumental Bourr?e by J. S. Bach, also used synthesizer and orchestral instrumental sounds Electric Light Orchestra had members who played violin, cello, string bass, several orchestral wind instruments, and synthesizer

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6 Progressive Rock Based on Classical Forms

Progressive Rock Based on Classical Forms

Musicians with classical and rock training used: Classical multi-movement forms such as the Suite (collection of dances) as basis of rock/classical compositions: Yess Close to the Edge (1972) and Relayer (1974) albums Electronic instruments and effects: King Crimson - Robert Fripps work with Brian Eno Rock instrument, but played rock versions of real classical compositions: Emerson, Lake and Palmers Intermezzo by Sibelius and Pictures at an Exhibition by Mussorgsky

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7 Listening Guide

Listening Guide

Roundabout by Yes (1971) Tempo: 135 beats per minute, 4 beats per bar most of the time, some 2 beat bars Form and Features: The recording begins with a backward taped crescendo dissolving into guitar harmonics, that sound repeats near the end of the recording, giving a sense of classical balance to the composition Section lengths vary greatly Backbeat in drums Bass riffs in instrumentals Keyboard instruments include both synthesizer and organ Some group vocals are overdubbed Lyrics: Unclear, but helpful to know that roundabouts are traffic circles in England, where drivers can change their course of direction if they wish Charts: Pop, #13

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8 Progressive Rock Influenced by Avant-Garde Trends

Progressive Rock Influenced by Avant-Garde Trends

Some avant-garde practices used by Pink Floyd: Minimalism (systematic music) Semi-constant repetition of short melodies Non-traditional sound makers used as instruments Old cash register in Money, and various sounds of televisions, wind, or other non-musical sounds Aleatory Echoes from Pink Floyds Meddle (1971) album Odd meters such as 7-beat bars Money from Dark Side of the Moon (1973) album

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9 Listening Guide

Listening Guide

Money by Pink Floyd (1973) Tempo: 120 beats per minute, 7 beats per bar, except for part of the instrumental and the ending that have 4 beats per bar Form: 12-bar blues in a minor key Features: The recording begins with the sounds of old-fashioned cash registers ringing and their change drawers opening. The cash resister sounds fall into a 7-beat pattern that is then picked up by the bass when it enters The drums accent the 2nd, 4th, and 6th backbeats, leaving beats 7 and 1 as two unaccented beats in a row. Most rock backbeats based on 4-beat bars accent every other beat. A funk-style tenor saxophone solo is featured in the instrumental section The bass line follows the 7-beat meter, and changes to fit the 4-beat meter during the instrumental section The recording ends with casual conversation that continues into the next album cut Lyrics: The lyrics constitute a satirical commentary on money and its effects on people, both mocking the wealthy and commenting on the underclass Charts: Pop, #13

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10 Frank Zappa

Frank Zappa

Played rhythm & blues rock guitar Interests in avant-garde art music, and jazz Stressed importance of individual freedom, similar to the ideas of the Beat writers Band of changing membership, the Mothers of Invention, recorded songs that took stabs at conventional, conformist attitudes as phony Outspoken style hated censorship of all kinds In addition to rock music, Zappa composed movie scores and music played by avant-garde classical musicians Dont Eat the Yellow Snow was one of Zappas few pop-chart entries

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11 Listening Guide

Listening Guide

Dont Eat the Yellow Snow (single version), by Frank Zappa (1974) Tempo: The recording has three sections: 1) 138 beats per minute with 7 beats per bar 2) Double-time section with 2-beats per bar 3) 46 beats per minute, 4 beats per bar Form: 1) 1-bar bass riff repeats with vocals above it at irregular times 2) Double-time section has repetitions of a 4-bar phrase 3) 30 4-beat bars, then an abrupt interruption after the first two beats of the last bar Features: Even beat subdivisions The sound of wind expresses cold Backup group vocals respond to lead vocal lines Double-time section has group vocals in rapid patter style Descending bass line leads into final section with almost spoken lyrics 1-bar riff in last section Lyrics: A dream about an Eskimo defending his seal against a fur trader by rubbing snow with dog urine in it into his eyes and the trader reacts by rubbing dog doo into the dreamers eyes. The story is a metaphor for the coercive way in which members of society treat each other Charts: Pop, 86

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12 Progressive Rock with Roots in Hard Rock

Progressive Rock with Roots in Hard Rock

Rush, Canadian power trio, began playing songs by Led Zeppelin and Cream Alex Lifeson, guitarist with classical training Geddy Lee, bass player Neil Peart, drummer and songwriter Concept albums such as 2112 (1976) about the battle of forces in a depersonalized society in the year 2112 Added synthesizer to sound during the mid-eighties Less active in late nineties and early two-thousands Continues to record and tour after 2002

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13 Listening Guide

Listening Guide

New World Man by Rush (1982) Tempo: 160 beats per minute, 4 beats per bar Form: A 16-bar instrumental introduction is followed by seven sections of unequal lengths and frequent changes of key Features: Both even and uneven beat subdivisions are used Drums accent a backbeat Synthesizer repeats a 1-bar riff pattern The bass plays other riff patterns at various sections of the recording Lyrics: The song ambiguously embraces the frenetic changes associated with scientific modernity, both celebrating them and expressing a distrust of the new world Charts: Pop, #21, British hits, #42

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14 Glitter Rock

Glitter Rock

Beat writer Jack Kerouacs novel On the Road (1957) impressed David Jones (David Bowie) with expression of alienation and conformist middle-class society Jones (Bowie after 1966), played saxophone, other instruments, and sang in Mod clubs in London Beat writer Allen Ginsbergs writings demanding acceptance of homosexuality inspired a trend of performers wearing androgynous dress in New York and London, Bowie became part of that movement In addition to being an multi-instrumentalist, a singer, and songwriter, Bowie was an artist and a professional actor First important image as spaceman Major Tom, inspired by movie 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) Bowie was an important glitter artist, but his music and acting does not always fit that style

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15 Listening Guide

Listening Guide

Space Oddity by David Bowie (1968) Tempo: 69 beats per minute, 4 beats per bar Form: Complex with four sections of unequal lengths and little repetition Features: Recording begins with strummed acoustic guitar, then snare drum, and military march beat String and other orchestral instruments used along with strummed acoustic guitar Electronics and strings use glissandos as spacy sound effects Frequent key changes are used to add effect of instability Bowies voice is sometimes overdubbed Lyrics: A poignant image of an astronaut lost on a space walk separated not only from earth, but his own capsule, facing death Charts: Pop, #15, British hits, #5 and later #1

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16 Other Glitter Performers

Other Glitter Performers

Elton John Marc Bolan (T-Rex) Gary Glitter Roxy Music Kiss Alice Cooper Boy George Bon Jovi (early) Queen

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17 Listening Guide

Listening Guide

Bohemian Rhapsody by Queen (1975) Tempo: 72 beats per minute, 4 beats per bar, with some variations in tempo Form and Features: Lead vocals by Freddie Mercury, but other band members overdubbed group vocals Mini-opera begins with a cappella group vocals, then the solo aria Drums sometimes accent a backbeat, not always Percussion instruments add to lyrics, example, the word shivers is supported by chimes Most verses use new melodies to fit the events in the story instead of repeating music to each section Fourth verse is faster (144 beats per minute) and uses antiphonal choruses to express positions for and against the release of the murderer Heavy bass and distorted guitar add power as the murderer begs for freedom Ending slower (80 beats per minute) and the final sound of a gong Lyrics: The recording is a mini-opera, sung from the perspective of a man who has just committed a murder and confesses it to his mother. One chorus represents a society that begs for leniency and the other a society that wants to get rid of the murderer. An epilogue states that nothing really makes an difference anyway. Charts: Pop, #9 and later #2, British hits, #1

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18 Discussion Questions

Discussion Questions

Progressive rock is often called pretentious. It is? Why does androgyny make some people uncomfortable? To what degree was glitter an expression of homosexuality, and to what degree was it merely rebellion against those who were easily offended by it? Might glitter music and the surrounding culture have reflected or promoted the gay rights movement?

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Progressive and Glitter Rock
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