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The Life and Adventures of Jack London
The Life and Adventures of Jack London
The Life and Adventures of Jack London
The Life and Adventures of Jack London
Thesis Statement
Thesis Statement
White Fang
White Fang
Family Background and Early Life
Family Background and Early Life
Marriage
Marriage
Racial Views
Racial Views
Darwinism
Darwinism
Socialism
Socialism
Realism/Naturalism
Realism/Naturalism
Occupations
Occupations
Gold Rush
Gold Rush
Karl Marx
Karl Marx
Ernst Haeckel
Ernst Haeckel
David Starr Jordan
David Starr Jordan
John Tyndall
John Tyndall
Herbert Spencer
Herbert Spencer
Friedrich Nietzsche
Friedrich Nietzsche
1876-1916
1876-1916
Death
Death
Jack Londons Writing Style
Jack Londons Writing Style
Conclusion
Conclusion
Work Cited
Work Cited
The Life and Adventures of Jack London
The Life and Adventures of Jack London

: The Life and Adventures of Jack London. : George Kevas. : The Life and Adventures of Jack London.ppt. zip-: 385 .

The Life and Adventures of Jack London

The Life and Adventures of Jack London.ppt
1 The Life and Adventures of Jack London

The Life and Adventures of Jack London

By: Yanni Kevas

2 The Life and Adventures of Jack London
3 Thesis Statement

Thesis Statement

Jack Londons life was contradictory. At points in his life, he wrote best-selling novels using various philosophies as well as amazing short stories, but during these times, he was also an alcoholic, oyster pirate, hobo, gold miner, and a lot more. His life was a mystery, that we will never fully solve.

4 White Fang

White Fang

White Fang, half-dog and half wolf, is destroyed by the cruel treatment of humans. He is hostile towards those that approach him. White Fang is at the top of the food chain, for he is the Blessed Wolf, and all that oppose him would never see the next day, but there is one thing that could save White Fang- human love. White Fang is slowly saved by this love. Eventually, White Fang becomes a creature of loyalty, obedience, and affection.

5 Family Background and Early Life

Family Background and Early Life

Jack London had an awkward family. He was constantly moving, and his parents were a total mess. Londons early life was hectic. He was deserted by his father and then raised by his mother, who eventually gave him up to an ex-slave. The ex-slaves name was Virginia Prentiss, and she raised London through infancy. Jack London eventually went on to complete grade school in Oakland. (newworldencyclopedia.org)

6 Marriage

Marriage

married Bess Maddern on April 7, 1900, the same day The Son of the Wolf was published. They were friends, and Jack London even said that he didnt love her. He thought marrying someone he didnt actually love would create a successful marriage. In 1904, London divorced Bess, and married Charmian Kittredge. London called her mate woman, and they went on numerous trips together. They attempted to have children, but one died, and the other was a miscarriage. (newworldencyclopedia.org)

7 Racial Views

Racial Views

Jack London was a racist. He was concerned about Asian immigration, and wrote an essay called The Yellow Peril. It criticizes Asians. Although Jack London disliked Asians, he admired Japanese customs and capabilities. London portrayed Mexican and Hawaiian characters, as well as Asian characters, in his short stories. In 1910, there was a huge fight, and one of the competitors was black and the other white. Jack London said that he routed for Jeffries, who was the white man, but he praised Johnson highly. Jack Londons racial views are not evident in his novels, but are common in his short stories. (wikipedia.org)

8 Darwinism

Darwinism

designates a distinctive form of evolutionary explanation for the history and diversity of life on Earth Darwinism is a type of evolution that is evident in The Call of the Wild and White Fang. (plato.stanford.edu)

9 Socialism

Socialism

any of various economic and political theories advocating collective or governmental ownership and administration of the means of production and distribution of goods. There is no private property. the means of production are owned and controlled by the state. Socialism is morally corrupting, and is not very evident in Jack Londons writing. Londons most popular piece of Socialist writing is The Iron Heel. It is about a socialist movement in the United States, which would lead to an alternate future. (socialistviewpoint.org)

10 Realism/Naturalism

Realism/Naturalism

Realism and Naturalism are very closely related. They both render reality closely, which is like verisimilitude. In Realism and Naturalism, character is more important than the plot. Both ideas are in explicable relation to nature, to each other, to their social class, and to their own past. The working class is also commonly used in these types of novels. Lastly, they both involve plausible events, and diction is natural vernacular, which basically means that the word choice and dialogue reflects the setting of the story. (wsu.edu)

11 Occupations

Occupations

London was in the working class, and his various jobs were very labor intensive. He was an oyster pirate on the San Francisco Bay. Jack London was also on a fish patrol to catch poachers. He sailed the Pacific on a sealing ship as well. At one point in his life, Jack was also a hobo. His most famous job, other than being an author, was in the Yukon where he mined for gold. (london.sonoma.edu)

12 Gold Rush

Gold Rush

Jack London joined the gold rush because he was desperate, and he actually had to borrow money from his step sister to get to the Klondike. When Jack London got to the Klondike, he was first tested by a pair of rapids at Miles Canyon and Whitehorse. London successfully navigated the rapids, and helped others cross for money. Later during his trip, Jack was stuck at a cabin all winter, 75 miles away from his destination. They later found gold on the Stewart River. London said, It was in the Klondike I found myself. There, nobody talks. Everybody thinks. You get your true perspective. I got mine. I think this quote really resembles Londons writing style, which is short, simple, and direct yet very powerful. The Gold Rush and Londons northern experience influenced many of Jack Londons novels and short stories, such as The Call of the Wild and White Fang. (literarytraveler.com)

13 Karl Marx

Karl Marx

Marxs essays influenced Jack London the most. His theories led London to advocate socialism. Londons longing for a socialist revolution is evident in The Iron Heel. (london.sonoma.edu)

14 Ernst Haeckel

Ernst Haeckel

Ernst has influenced Londons scientific knowledge. His theory states that the development of animal origin recapitulates the evolutionary history of its species. This theory also pertains to humans. Ernst also influenced Londons racialism. Ernst created Monism as well, which is the study of the world. (london.sonoma.edu)

15 David Starr Jordan

David Starr Jordan

London and Jordan first met in Oakland where Jack attended Davids lectures about evolution. David was a major supporter of Social Darwinism, as well as a supporter of the eugenics movement. London also supported the eugenics movement and it was Jordan who most likely introduced it to him. (london.sonoma.edu)

16 John Tyndall

John Tyndall

John was a supporter of Charles Darwins theories. He was a man of ordinary means who rose above his surroundings. Tyndall had a dynamic personality and was a role model to Jack London. (london.sonoma.edu)

17 Herbert Spencer

Herbert Spencer

Spencer created the phrase survival of the fittest, which is a reoccurring theme in The Call of the Wild, White Fang, and other books that involve the wild. Spencer adapted the theory of evolution into a social system in which those individuals, species, or races with the best acquired characteristics would survive. Herberts writings were responsible for the rise of the Social Darwinism. (london.sonoma.edu)

18 Friedrich Nietzsche

Friedrich Nietzsche

Friedrich was a German philosopher that developed the superman theory. The superman was perfect in both mind and body. The theory is incorporated in Martin Eden and The Sea Wolf. At the end of The Call of the Wild, Buck is a superdog, and White Fang is a superwolf in the middle of the story. (london.sonoma.edu)

19 1876-1916

1876-1916

a time of major change Industrialization and urbanization were dominant, and there was also segregation and racial differences. workers movements responded to unhealthy conditions, long hours, and low pay. Women sought the right to vote. Reformers attacked a variety of concerns, and socialism developed. literature, art, and architecture flourished. The public became better educated, and a middle-class emerged. (london.sonoma.edu)

20 Death

Death

Jack Londons death is controversial. older sources describe it as a suicide, some still do, but it is most likely a rumor. Uremia could also have been the cause. He was in extreme pain and taking morphine. a morphine overdose, accidental or deliberate, may have contributed. (readeasily.com)

21 Jack Londons Writing Style

Jack Londons Writing Style

Jack Londons novels are short, simple, and direct. I found an example in White Fang, and it says White Fang was very wise. Simple sentences are used commonly in Londons writing. Jacks naturalistic writing style also focuses on character development. White Fang develops into a regular dog, while Buck becomes a vicious beast. Plot is important, but not as vital as the characters. Setting is significant in Jack Londons writing as well. The setting in White Fang and The Call of the Wild is the Klondike. Jack London describes the setting using his own personal experiences. Verisimilitude is used a lot in Londons writings too.

22 Conclusion

Conclusion

Jack Londons life was really interesting. As a young boy, he grew up having to deal with crazy parents and lots of moving. When he grew up, he dealt with many jobs, including gold mining in the Klondike. Jack London believed in many philosophies, and was influenced by many people. Lastly, Jack London was an amazing author, and that is why is books are still popular today.

23 Work Cited

Work Cited

Tennant, Roy and Stasz, Clarice The Jack London Online Collection Sonoma State University Library 3 July 2009 Web 17 May 2011 http://london.sonoma.edu/ London, Jack newworldencyclopedia.org 4 August 2007 Web 17 May 2011 http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Jack_London Jack London wikipedia.org 23 May 2011 Web 17 May 2011 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_London Darwinism Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy Stanford University 19 January 2010 Web 17 May 2011 http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/darwinism/ Haigh, Ken The Spell of the Yukon: Jack London and the Klondike Gold Rush Literary Traveler Web 17 May 2011 http://literarytraveler.com/literary_articles/jack_london_yukon.aspx

24 The Life and Adventures of Jack London
The Life and Adventures of Jack London
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