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What Makes for a Good Research Presentation
What Makes for a Good Research Presentation
Three Components to a Good Talk
Three Components to a Good Talk
Preparation Before the Talk
Preparation Before the Talk
Rule of thumb for all talks
Rule of thumb for all talks
Giving the Talk
Giving the Talk
Giving the Talk: road maps
Giving the Talk: road maps
Giving the Talk: explaining results
Giving the Talk: explaining results
Giving the Talk: readability
Giving the Talk: readability
What Makes for a Good Research Presentation
What Makes for a Good Research Presentation
Giving the Talk: readability
Giving the Talk: readability
Hypotheses
Hypotheses
Giving the Talk: readability
Giving the Talk: readability
Politics of the Elderly Life-cycle versus cohort effects Do senior
Politics of the Elderly Life-cycle versus cohort effects Do senior
My preference for presentation
My preference for presentation
Style preferences - content
Style preferences - content
Style preferences - time
Style preferences - time
Q&A
Q&A
Q&A: defending your work
Q&A: defending your work
You know something is wrong when questioners ask:
You know something is wrong when questioners ask:
Closing Thoughts
Closing Thoughts

Презентация на тему: «What Makes for a Good Research Presentation». Автор: Valued Gateway Client. Файл: «What Makes for a Good Research Presentation.ppt». Размер zip-архива: 241 КБ.

What Makes for a Good Research Presentation

содержание презентации «What Makes for a Good Research Presentation.ppt»
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1 What Makes for a Good Research Presentation

What Makes for a Good Research Presentation

Adapted from: Tom Carsey University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

2 Three Components to a Good Talk

Three Components to a Good Talk

Preparation Before the Talk Giving the Talk Q &A

3 Preparation Before the Talk

Preparation Before the Talk

Ask about the room, allotted time, and “norms” for your talk Consider the audience (general or not) For job talks – Cover your first authored work Maybe at the end “works in progress” Never exceed time limit - usually one hour Anticipate equipment problems Have a back-up plan in place Practice, Practice, Practice

4 Rule of thumb for all talks

Rule of thumb for all talks

Tell them what you’re going to tell them Tell them Tell them what you told them

5 Giving the Talk

Giving the Talk

Know your work inside and out Data, methods, measures, descriptive statistics, literature, etc. Don’t give handouts at the beginning Audience will read them rather than listen to you Ask that questions be held until the end Many like questions during the talk, but you need to know how to handle them Less important to hit a home run than it is to avoid striking out Avoid jargon Substance over Methods

6 Giving the Talk: road maps

Giving the Talk: road maps

Get to the point (really nail that first 2 minutes) Give them a road map and keep on it It is O.K. to preview the findings It’s not a murder mystery Bad jokes are worse than no jokes Tell the audience why should the audience care? Have a Conclusion What did we learn? Where does it fit?

7 Giving the Talk: explaining results

Giving the Talk: explaining results

Really explain your graphs, figures, and tables E.g. what is the x-axis? What does each number mean In other words, really explain your results (don’t leave them guessing) Do not read long wordy slides Don’t even have long wordy slides Long quotes are often a waste of time and space

8 Giving the Talk: readability

Giving the Talk: readability

You can’t tell them everything, so tell them something well Graphs often say more than tables PowerPoint slides and/or overheads need to be readable Don’t do this (Table) Or this (Text) Or this (Graphics)

9 What Makes for a Good Research Presentation
10 Giving the Talk: readability

Giving the Talk: readability

Graphs often say more than tables PowerPoint slides and/or overheads need to be readable Don’t do this (Table) Or this (Text) Or this (Graphics)

11 Hypotheses

Hypotheses

The policy balancing theory generates two primary hypotheses: (1) that individuals who prefer that the President and the majority in Congress be from different parties are more likely than individuals who prefer that the President and the congressional majority be from the same party to cast split-ticket votes. (2) that individuals’ preferences for partisan control of government are shaped by their own ideological locations and their perceptions of the locations of the two parties

12 Giving the Talk: readability

Giving the Talk: readability

Graphs often say more than tables PowerPoint slides and/or overheads need to be readable Don’t do this (Table) Or this (Text) Or this (Graphics)

13 Politics of the Elderly Life-cycle versus cohort effects Do senior

Politics of the Elderly Life-cycle versus cohort effects Do senior

citizens really oppose public school funding? Mobilizing the senior vote

14 My preference for presentation

My preference for presentation

Outline Introduction to the problem Your solution and contribution Background, related work and where your work fits in Describe your work Most of the talk is here Conclusions and future work

15 Style preferences - content

Style preferences - content

Detailed page Vs Highlighted page My preference: detailed page Shows you have lots of work Motivates questions Helps those who already get it Helps condense a talk to a shorter time span Let’s others give your presentations Colleagues, boss, etc.

16 Style preferences - time

Style preferences - time

30 min talk should not contain more than 30 ppt slides Do not use “here slides” in your outline as you go along to point out where you are Do not waste titles with repeated headings

17 Q&A

Q&A

Pay attention to the question Give direct answers Be complete, but don’t ramble It is O.K. to: Pause Take notes Say “I don’t know” (at least sometimes) Keep your cool

18 Q&A: defending your work

Q&A: defending your work

Try to strike a balance: Defend without becoming defensive Be confident, but not arrogant Accept fair criticism, but don’t cave in Q&A should be a conversation among equals (Relax, keep your energy up, and stay cool)

19 You know something is wrong when questioners ask:

You know something is wrong when questioners ask:

What is your research question? What are your conclusions? Why should anyone (usually the questioner) care about this? Nothing at all (at least at job talks)

20 Closing Thoughts

Closing Thoughts

Be yourself, but . . . Keep your energy up If you appear bored, the audience will be for sure Stay positive It should be a conversation, not combat, and it takes two to fight Strive for excellence, but remember that perfection is unattainable Relax: trust your preparation and your knowledge

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