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Asthma
Asthma
What is Asthma
What is Asthma
Pathology of Asthma
Pathology of Asthma
Asthma Prevalence in the United States
Asthma Prevalence in the United States
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Asthma Period Prevalence and Current Asthma Prevalence: United States,
Asthma Period Prevalence and Current Asthma Prevalence: United States,
Current Asthma Prevalence: United States, 2001-2010
Current Asthma Prevalence: United States, 2001-2010
Current Asthma Prevalence by Race and Ethnicity: United States,
Current Asthma Prevalence by Race and Ethnicity: United States,
Current Asthma Prevalence by Age Group, Sex, Race and Ethnicity,
Current Asthma Prevalence by Age Group, Sex, Race and Ethnicity,
Child and Adult Current Asthma Prevalence by Age and Sex: United
Child and Adult Current Asthma Prevalence by Age and Sex: United
Asthma Attack Prevalence among Children and Adults with Current Asthma
Asthma Attack Prevalence among Children and Adults with Current Asthma
Asthma Attack Prevalence among Persons with Current Asthma by Age
Asthma Attack Prevalence among Persons with Current Asthma by Age
Technical Notes
Technical Notes
Sources
Sources
Sources (continued)
Sources (continued)
What is Epidemiology
What is Epidemiology
Risk Factors for Developing Asthma
Risk Factors for Developing Asthma
Risk Factors for Developing Asthma: Genetic Characteristics
Risk Factors for Developing Asthma: Genetic Characteristics
Risk Factors for Developing Asthma: Environmental Exposure
Risk Factors for Developing Asthma: Environmental Exposure
Clearing the Air: Categories for Associations of Various Elements
Clearing the Air: Categories for Associations of Various Elements
Clearing the Air: Indoor Air Exposures & Asthma Development
Clearing the Air: Indoor Air Exposures & Asthma Development
Clearing the Air: Indoor Air Exposures & Asthma Exacerbation
Clearing the Air: Indoor Air Exposures & Asthma Exacerbation
Reducing Exposure to House Dust Mites
Reducing Exposure to House Dust Mites
Reducing Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke
Reducing Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke
Reducing Exposure to Cockroaches
Reducing Exposure to Cockroaches
Reducing Exposure to Pets
Reducing Exposure to Pets
Reducing Exposure to Mold
Reducing Exposure to Mold
Other Asthma Triggers
Other Asthma Triggers
Clinical Management of Asthma
Clinical Management of Asthma
2007 NAEPP EPR-3
2007 NAEPP EPR-3
What is GIP
What is GIP
GIPs Six Key Messages
GIPs Six Key Messages
Diagnosing Asthma: Medical History
Diagnosing Asthma: Medical History
Diagnosing Asthma
Diagnosing Asthma
Diagnosing Asthma
Diagnosing Asthma
Diagnosing Asthma: Spirometry
Diagnosing Asthma: Spirometry
Medications to Treat Asthma
Medications to Treat Asthma
Medications to Treat Asthma: Long-Term Control
Medications to Treat Asthma: Long-Term Control
Medications to Treat Asthma: Quick-Relief
Medications to Treat Asthma: Quick-Relief
Medications to Treat Asthma: How to Use a Spray Inhaler
Medications to Treat Asthma: How to Use a Spray Inhaler
Medications to Treat Asthma: Inhalers and Spacers
Medications to Treat Asthma: Inhalers and Spacers
Medications to Treat Asthma: Nebulizer
Medications to Treat Asthma: Nebulizer
Managing Asthma: Asthma Management Goals
Managing Asthma: Asthma Management Goals
Managing Asthma: Asthma Action Plan
Managing Asthma: Asthma Action Plan
Managing Asthma: Sample Asthma Action Plan
Managing Asthma: Sample Asthma Action Plan
Managing Asthma: Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) Meters
Managing Asthma: Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) Meters
Managing Asthma: Peak Flow Chart
Managing Asthma: Peak Flow Chart
Managing Asthma: Indications of a Severe Attack
Managing Asthma: Indications of a Severe Attack
Managing Asthma: Things People with Asthma Can Do
Managing Asthma: Things People with Asthma Can Do
A Public Health Response to Asthma
A Public Health Response to Asthma
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Surveillance
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Surveillance
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Uses of Surveillance Data
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Uses of Surveillance Data
A Public Health Response to Asthma Education
A Public Health Response to Asthma Education
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Coalition
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Coalition
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Advocacy
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Advocacy
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Interventions
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Interventions
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Medical Management Interventions
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Medical Management Interventions
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Environmental Interventions
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Environmental Interventions
A Public Health Response to Asthma: School Intervention Science-Based
A Public Health Response to Asthma: School Intervention Science-Based
Key Aspects
Key Aspects
Strategies for Addressing Asthma
Strategies for Addressing Asthma
A Public Health Response to Asthma: School
A Public Health Response to Asthma: School
On average, 3 children in a classroom of 30
On average, 3 children in a classroom of 30
A Public Health Response to Asthma: What can make asthma worse in the
A Public Health Response to Asthma: What can make asthma worse in the
Asthma-Friendly School DVD and Toolkit
Asthma-Friendly School DVD and Toolkit
A Public Health Response to Asthma: School Actions
A Public Health Response to Asthma: School Actions
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Evaluation
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Evaluation
Benefits of Program Evaluation
Benefits of Program Evaluation
Using Evaluation to Improve Programs
Using Evaluation to Improve Programs
Framework for Program Evaluation
Framework for Program Evaluation
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Summary
A Public Health Response to Asthma: Summary
Resources
Resources
Resources
Resources

: Asthma. : prr4. : Asthma.ppt. zip-: 7775 .

Asthma

Asthma.ppt
1 Asthma

Asthma

A Presentation on Asthma Management and Prevention

2 What is Asthma

What is Asthma

Chronic disease of the airways that may cause Wheezing Breathlessness Chest tightness Nighttime or early morning coughing Episodes are usually associated with widespread, but variable, airflow obstruction within the lung that is often reversible either spontaneously or with treatment.

3 Pathology of Asthma

Pathology of Asthma

Asthma involves inflammation of the airways

Asthma

Normal

Source: What You and Your Family Can Do About Asthma by the Global Initiative For Asthma Created and funded by NIH/NHLBI, 1995

4 Asthma Prevalence in the United States

Asthma Prevalence in the United States

June 2014

National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects

5 Introduction

Introduction

Asthma: affects 25.7 million people, including 7.0 million children under 18; is a significant health and economic burden to patients, their families, and society: In 2010, 1.8 million people visited an ED for asthma-related care and 439,000 people were hospitalized because of asthma

6 Introduction

Introduction

Asthma prevalence is an estimate of the percentage of the U.S. population with asthma. Prevalence estimates help us understand the burden of asthma on the nation. Asthma period prevalence is the percentage of the U.S. population that had asthma in the previous 12 months. Current asthma prevalence is the percentage of the U.S. population who had been diagnosed with asthma and had asthma at the time of the survey. Asthma period prevalence was the original prevalence measure (1980-1996). The survey was redesigned in 1997 and this measure was replaced by lifetime prevalence (not presented in slides) and asthma episode or attack in the past 12 months. In 2001, another measure was added to assess current asthma prevalence.

7 Asthma Period Prevalence and Current Asthma Prevalence: United States,

Asthma Period Prevalence and Current Asthma Prevalence: United States,

1980-2010

Current asthma prevalence, 2001-2010

Asthma period prevalence, 1980-1996

The percentage of the U.S. population with asthma increased from 3.1% in 1980 to 5.5% in 1996 and 7.3% in 2001 to 8.4% in 2010.

8 Current Asthma Prevalence: United States, 2001-2010

Current Asthma Prevalence: United States, 2001-2010

Year

Percent

Total number of persons

One in 12 people (about 26 million, or 8% of the U.S. population) had asthma in 2010, compared with 1 in 14 (about 20 million, or 7%) in 2001.

9 Current Asthma Prevalence by Race and Ethnicity: United States,

Current Asthma Prevalence by Race and Ethnicity: United States,

2001-2010

Blacks are more likely to have asthma than both Whites and Hispanics.

10 Current Asthma Prevalence by Age Group, Sex, Race and Ethnicity,

Current Asthma Prevalence by Age Group, Sex, Race and Ethnicity,

Poverty Status, Geographic Region, and Urbanicity: United States, Average Annual 2008-2010

Children, females, Blacks, and Puerto Ricans are more likely to have asthma.

People with lower annual household income were more likely to have asthma.

Residents of the Northeast and Midwest were more likely to have asthma.

Living in or not in a city did not affect the chances of having asthma.

11 Child and Adult Current Asthma Prevalence by Age and Sex: United

Child and Adult Current Asthma Prevalence by Age and Sex: United

States, 2006-2010

Among children aged 0-14, boys were more likely than girls to have asthma. Boys and girls aged 15-17 years had asthma at the same rate.. Among adults women were more likely than men to have asthma.

12 Asthma Attack Prevalence among Children and Adults with Current Asthma

Asthma Attack Prevalence among Children and Adults with Current Asthma

United States, 2001-2010

Children aged 0-17 years

Adults aged 18 and over

From 2001 to 2010 both children and adults had fewer asthma attacks. For children, asthma attacks declined from at least one asthma attack in the previous 12 months for 61.7% of children with asthma in 2001 to 58.3% in 2010. For adults, asthma attacks declined from at least one asthma attack in the previous 12 months for 53.8% of adults with asthma in 2001, to 49.1% in 2010.

13 Asthma Attack Prevalence among Persons with Current Asthma by Age

Asthma Attack Prevalence among Persons with Current Asthma by Age

Group, Sex, Race and Ethnicity, Poverty Status, and Geographic Region: Unites States, Average Annual 2008-2010

From 2008 to 2010 asthma attacks occurred more often in children and women, among families whose income was below 100% of the federal poverty threshold, and in the South and West. Race or ethnicity did not significantly affect asthma attack prevalence.

14 Technical Notes

Technical Notes

Asthma Period Prevalence and Current Asthma Prevalence: Estimates of asthma prevalence indicate the percentage of the population with asthma at a given point in time and represent the burden on the U.S. population. Asthma prevalence data are self-reported by respondents to the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). Asthma period prevalence was the original measure (1980-1996) of U.S. asthma prevalence and estimated the percentage of the population that had asthma in the previous 12 months. From 1997-2000, a redesign of the NHIS questions resulted in a break in the trend data as the new questions were not fully comparable to the previous questions. Beginning in 2001, current asthma prevalence (measured by the question, Do you still have asthma? for those with an asthma diagnosis) was introduced to identify all persons with asthma. Current asthma prevalence estimates from 2001 onward are point prevalence (previous 12 months) estimates and therefore are not directly comparable with asthma period prevalence estimates from 1980 to 1996 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS): State asthma prevalence rates on the map come from the BRFSS. The BRFSS is a state-based, random-digit-dialed telephone survey of the noninstitutionalized civilian population 18 years of age and older. It monitors the prevalence of the major behavioral risks among adults associated with premature illness and death. Information from the survey is used to improve the health of the American people. More information about BRFSS can be found at: http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/.

15 Sources

Sources

16 Sources (continued)

Sources (continued)

17 What is Epidemiology

What is Epidemiology

The study of the distribution and determinants of diseases and injuries in human populations.

Source: Mausner and Kramer, Mausner and Bahn Epidemiology- An Introductory Text, 1985.

18 Risk Factors for Developing Asthma

Risk Factors for Developing Asthma

Genetic characteristics Occupational exposures Environmental exposures

19 Risk Factors for Developing Asthma: Genetic Characteristics

Risk Factors for Developing Asthma: Genetic Characteristics

Atopy The bodys predisposition to develop an antibody called immunoglobulin E (IgE) in response to exposure to environmental allergens Can be measured in the blood Includes allergic rhinitis, asthma, hay fever, and eczema

20 Risk Factors for Developing Asthma: Environmental Exposure

Risk Factors for Developing Asthma: Environmental Exposure

Clearing the Air: Asthma and Indoor Air Exposures http://www.iom.edu (Publications) Institute of Medicine, 2000 Committee on the Assessment of Asthma and Indoor Air Review of current evidence about indoor air exposures and asthma

21 Clearing the Air: Categories for Associations of Various Elements

Clearing the Air: Categories for Associations of Various Elements

Sufficient evidence of a causal relationship Sufficient evidence of an association Limited or suggested evidence of an association Inadequate or insufficient evidence to determine whether an association exists Limited or suggestive evidence of no association

22 Clearing the Air: Indoor Air Exposures & Asthma Development

Clearing the Air: Indoor Air Exposures & Asthma Development

Biological Agents Sufficient evidence of causal relationship House dust mite Sufficient evidence of association None found Limited or suggestive evidence of association Cockroach (among pre-school aged children) Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

Chemical Agents Sufficient evidence of causal relationship None found Sufficient evidence of association Environmental Tobacco Smoke (among pre-school aged children) Limited or suggestive evidence of association None found

23 Clearing the Air: Indoor Air Exposures & Asthma Exacerbation

Clearing the Air: Indoor Air Exposures & Asthma Exacerbation

Biological Agents Sufficient evidence of causal relationship Cat Cockroach House dust mite Sufficient evidence of an association Dog Fungus/Molds Rhinovirus Limited or suggestive evidence of association Domestic birds Chlamydia and Mycoplasma pneumonia RSV

Chemical Agents Sufficient evidence of causal relationship Environmental tobacco smoke (among pre-school aged children) Sufficient evidence of association NO2, NOX (high levels) Limited or suggestive evidence of association Environmental Tobacco Smoke (among school-aged, older children, and adults) Formaldehyde Fragrances

24 Reducing Exposure to House Dust Mites

Reducing Exposure to House Dust Mites

Use bedding encasements Wash bed linens weekly Avoid down fillings Limit stuffed animals to those that can be washed Reduce humidity level (between 30% and 50% relative humidity per EPR-3)

Source: What You and Your Family Can Do About Asthma by the Global Initiative For Asthma Created and funded by NIH/NHLBI, 1995

25 Reducing Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke

Reducing Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke

Evidence suggests an association between environmental tobacco smoke exposure and exacerbations of asthma among school-aged, older children, and adults.

Evidence shows an association between environmental tobacco smoke exposure and asthma development among pre-school aged children.

26 Reducing Exposure to Cockroaches

Reducing Exposure to Cockroaches

Remove as many water and food sources as possible to avoid cockroaches.

27 Reducing Exposure to Pets

Reducing Exposure to Pets

People who are allergic to pets should not have them in the house. At a minimum, do not allow pets in the bedroom.

28 Reducing Exposure to Mold

Reducing Exposure to Mold

Eliminating mold and the moist conditions that permit mold growth may help prevent asthma exacerbations.

29 Other Asthma Triggers

Other Asthma Triggers

Air pollution Trees, grass, and weed pollen

30 Clinical Management of Asthma

Clinical Management of Asthma

Expert Panel Report 3 National Asthma Education and Prevention Program National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, 2007

Source: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/asthma/asthgdln.pdf

31 2007 NAEPP EPR-3

2007 NAEPP EPR-3

Treatment recommendations based on: Severity Control Responsiveness Provide patient self-management education at multiple points of care Reduce exposure to inhaled indoor allergens to control asthma-multifaceted approach

Source: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/asthma/asthgdln.pdf

32 What is GIP

What is GIP

Guidelines Implementation Panel Report for Expert Panel Report 3 Recommendations and strategies to implement EPR-3 Six key messages

Source: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/asthma/gip_rpt.pdf

33 GIPs Six Key Messages

GIPs Six Key Messages

Inhaled Corticosteroids Asthma Action Plan Asthma Severity

Asthma Control Follow-up Visits Allergen and Irritant Exposure Control

Source: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/asthma/gip_rpt.pdf

34 Diagnosing Asthma: Medical History

Diagnosing Asthma: Medical History

Symptoms Coughing Wheezing Shortness of breath Chest tightness Symptom Patterns Severity Family History

35 Diagnosing Asthma

Diagnosing Asthma

Troublesome cough, particularly at night Awakened by coughing Coughing or wheezing after physical activity Breathing problems during particular seasons Coughing, wheezing, or chest tightness after allergen exposure Colds that last more than 10 days Relief when medication is used

36 Diagnosing Asthma

Diagnosing Asthma

Wheezing sounds during normal breathing Hyperexpansion of the thorax Increased nasal secretions or nasal polyps Atopic dermatitis, eczema, or other allergic skin conditions

37 Diagnosing Asthma: Spirometry

Diagnosing Asthma: Spirometry

Test lung function when diagnosing asthma

38 Medications to Treat Asthma

Medications to Treat Asthma

Medications come in several forms. Two major categories of medications are: Long-term control Quick relief

39 Medications to Treat Asthma: Long-Term Control

Medications to Treat Asthma: Long-Term Control

Taken daily over a long period of time Used to reduce inflammation, relax airway muscles, and improve symptoms and lung function Inhaled corticosteroids Long-acting beta2-agonists Leukotriene modifiers

40 Medications to Treat Asthma: Quick-Relief

Medications to Treat Asthma: Quick-Relief

Used in acute episodes Generally short-acting beta2agonists

41 Medications to Treat Asthma: How to Use a Spray Inhaler

Medications to Treat Asthma: How to Use a Spray Inhaler

The health-care provider should evaluate inhaler technique at each visit.

Source: What You and Your Family Can Do About Asthma by the Global Initiative for Asthma Created and funded by NIH/NHLBI

42 Medications to Treat Asthma: Inhalers and Spacers

Medications to Treat Asthma: Inhalers and Spacers

Spacers can help patients who have difficulty with inhaler use and can reduce potential for adverse effects from medication.

43 Medications to Treat Asthma: Nebulizer

Medications to Treat Asthma: Nebulizer

Machine produces a mist of the medication Used for small children or for severe asthma episodes No evidence that it is more effective than an inhaler used with a spacer

44 Managing Asthma: Asthma Management Goals

Managing Asthma: Asthma Management Goals

Achieve and maintain control of symptoms Maintain normal activity levels, including exercise Maintain pulmonary function as close to normal levels as possible Prevent asthma exacerbations Avoid adverse effects from asthma medications Prevent asthma mortality

45 Managing Asthma: Asthma Action Plan

Managing Asthma: Asthma Action Plan

Develop with a physician Tailor to meet individual needs Educate patients and families about all aspects of plan Recognizing symptoms Medication benefits and side effects Proper use of inhalers and Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) meters

46 Managing Asthma: Sample Asthma Action Plan

Managing Asthma: Sample Asthma Action Plan

Describes medicines to use and actions to take

National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute Expert Panel Report 3 (EPR 3): Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma. NIH Publication no. 08-4051, 2007.

47 Managing Asthma: Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) Meters

Managing Asthma: Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) Meters

Allows patient to assess status of his/her asthma Persons who use peak flow meters should do so frequently Many physicians require for all severe patients

48 Managing Asthma: Peak Flow Chart

Managing Asthma: Peak Flow Chart

People with moderate or severe asthma should take readings: Every morning Every evening After an exacerbation Before inhaling certain medications

Source: What You and Your Family Can Do About Asthma by the Global Initiative For Asthma Created and funded by NIH/NHLBI

49 Managing Asthma: Indications of a Severe Attack

Managing Asthma: Indications of a Severe Attack

Breathless at rest Hunched forward Speaks in words rather than complete sentences Agitated Peak flow rate less than 60% of normal

50 Managing Asthma: Things People with Asthma Can Do

Managing Asthma: Things People with Asthma Can Do

Have an individual management plan containing Your medications (controller and quick-relief) Your asthma triggers What to do when you are having an asthma attack Educate yourself and others about Asthma Action Plans Environmental interventions Seek help from asthma resources Join an asthma support group

51 A Public Health Response to Asthma

A Public Health Response to Asthma

A call to action for organizations and people with an interest in asthma management to work as partners in reducing the burden of asthma within our nations communities.

52 A Public Health Response to Asthma: Surveillance

A Public Health Response to Asthma: Surveillance

Over time How much asthma does the population have? How severe is asthma across the population? How well controlled is asthma in the population? What is the cost of asthma?

53 A Public Health Response to Asthma: Uses of Surveillance Data

A Public Health Response to Asthma: Uses of Surveillance Data

Basis for planning and targeting intervention activities Evaluating intervention activities

54 A Public Health Response to Asthma Education

A Public Health Response to Asthma Education

Education programs can be targeted to: People with asthma Parents of children with asthma Medical care providers School staff Public

55 A Public Health Response to Asthma: Coalition

A Public Health Response to Asthma: Coalition

Successful asthma campaigns need the cooperation of committed partners.

56 A Public Health Response to Asthma: Advocacy

A Public Health Response to Asthma: Advocacy

Asthma needs to be addressed comprehensively by multiple government and non-government agencies.

57 A Public Health Response to Asthma: Interventions

A Public Health Response to Asthma: Interventions

Medical management Education Environment Schools

58 A Public Health Response to Asthma: Medical Management Interventions

A Public Health Response to Asthma: Medical Management Interventions

Ensure people with asthma know about their disease and are empowered to demand appropriate management

59 A Public Health Response to Asthma: Environmental Interventions

A Public Health Response to Asthma: Environmental Interventions

Help people create and maintain healthy home, school, and work environments. Environmental interventions may consist of: Assessments to identify asthma triggers Education on how to remove asthma triggers Remediation to remove asthma triggers

60 A Public Health Response to Asthma: School Intervention Science-Based

A Public Health Response to Asthma: School Intervention Science-Based

Guidance

Management and support systems Health and mental health services Asthma education for students, staff, and parents Healthy school environment Physical education and activity School, family, and community efforts

Source: www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/asthma/strategies

61 Key Aspects

Key Aspects

Require team effort Coordinate health, including mental and physical health, education, environment, family, and community efforts Assess needs of school and prioritize (every action step is not feasible to every school or district) Focus on students with frequent asthma symptoms, health room visits, and absenteeism

62 Strategies for Addressing Asthma

Strategies for Addressing Asthma

1. Management & Support Systems

6. School, Family, & Community Efforts

2. Health & Mental Health Services

5. Physical Education & Activity

3. Asthma Education

4. Healthy School Environment

63 A Public Health Response to Asthma: School

A Public Health Response to Asthma: School

A leading chronic disease cause of school absence Common disease addressed by school nurses Affects teachers, administrators, nurses, coaches, students, bus drivers, after school program staff, maintenance personnel

64 On average, 3 children in a classroom of 30

On average, 3 children in a classroom of 30

are likely to have asthma.*

*Epidemiology and Statistics Unit. Trends in Asthma Morbidity and Mortality. NYC: ALA, July 2006.

65 A Public Health Response to Asthma: What can make asthma worse in the

A Public Health Response to Asthma: What can make asthma worse in the

school?

Mold and mildew Animals in classroom Carpeted classrooms Cockroaches Poor air quality

66 Asthma-Friendly School DVD and Toolkit

Asthma-Friendly School DVD and Toolkit

Objectives Personal stories to relate to viewer Aspects of an asthma-friendly school Six strategies for addressing asthma in a coordinated school health program Potential impact of asthma-friendly schools

67 A Public Health Response to Asthma: School Actions

A Public Health Response to Asthma: School Actions

Establish policies and procedures to support children with asthma. Keep students asthma action plans at the school. Make medications available During school hours Before physical activity and sports During before- and after-school programs On field trips or when away from campus Train school staff to recognize signs of an asthma attack and to use appropriate medications.

68 A Public Health Response to Asthma: Evaluation

A Public Health Response to Asthma: Evaluation

The systematic investigation of the structure, activities, or outcomes of asthma control programs. Are we doing the right thing? Are we doing things right?

69 Benefits of Program Evaluation

Benefits of Program Evaluation

Evaluations help asthma programs Manage resources and services effectively Understand reasons for current performance Build capacity Plan and implement new activities Demonstrate the value of their efforts Ensure accountability

70 Using Evaluation to Improve Programs

Using Evaluation to Improve Programs

Highlight effective program components Recognize achievements Replicate successes Assess and prioritize needs Target program improvements Advocate for the program

71 Framework for Program Evaluation

Framework for Program Evaluation

72 A Public Health Response to Asthma: Summary

A Public Health Response to Asthma: Summary

Asthma is a complex disease that is not yet preventable or curable. Asthma can be managed with medication, environmental changes, and behavior modifications. By working together, we can ensure that people with asthma enjoy a high quality of life.

73 Resources

Resources

National Asthma Education and Prevention Program http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/naepp/ Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America http://www.aafa.org American Lung Association http://www.lungusa.org American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology http://www.aaaai.org Allergy and Asthma Network/Mothers of Asthmatics, Inc. http://www.aanma.org

74 Resources

Resources

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology http://www.acaai.org American College of Chest Physicians http://www.chestnet.org American Thoracic Society http://www.thoracic.org The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention http://www.cdc.gov/asthma

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